The Big One

You know, back when Richard Nixon ran for president, his slogan was “Nixon’s the one!” (and when his re-election rolled around, I remember people saying, “And he’ll be an even bigger one in ’72!”)

My God, there was even a song.

But let’s take a leisurely stroll back towards the topic I originally had in mind.

The Big One. As in earthquakes.

Growing up in southern California, you basically go through earthquake training. From the earliest age, they just showed up every now and then. By the time you realize an earthquake is happening, it’s over.  When you talk with relatives in the Midwest who aren’t afraid of tornadoes or friends back east who dust off hurricanes, both think you’re crazy for living in a place just poised for “The Big One.”

Earthquakes happen. 46 years ago, they had the so-called San Fernando Valley shaker, which killed 64 people near Los Angeles.  At that time, I was a sophomore in high school and when it happened at 6 in the morning, I thought it was my mom trying to wake me up for school. By the time I realized she wasn’t at the end of my bed shaking it, the quake was over.

Yes, there have been sizable earthquakes in the places I’ve resided over the years.  All along, we continually hear warnings that we need to be prepared for The Big One. I’m not saying it won’t happen in my lifetime, but I’ve been through a few cycles of the local TV news people deciding during sweeps to spotlight the threat, remind us to be prepared and how awful it will be after it hits.

In Seattle, they’re expecting communications to be down, impassable roads, panic, etc. But I’m reminded of the year when those of us in Earthquake Country really out-did ourselves.

The year was 1969. In June, I was going to graduate from the 8th grade. (stop looking so surprised) The Reverend Donald Abernathy told his Los Angeles area congregation that he had a vision. God had told him that a big earthquake was going to hit LA and so he convinced his entire church to move to Atlanta.  In the reverend’s vision, God was going to punish the City of Angels for all their sins by turning them into angels.

The result was Earthquake Fever. It was the buzz on everyone’s lips. Eventually, someone pin-pointed the actual time that the quake would hit and California would slide into the ocean. The most often-played song on the radio was all about the inevitable Big One. I offer this up to you with a warning. Listen to it a time or two and it will get stuck in your head.

Well, the big day that had be predicted for the earthquake to strike finally arrived. It was supposed to hit somewhere around 3pm.  I remember riding around on my Sears Schwinn-like bike that day while keeping an eye on my watch.  As a 14-year-old kid, your mind is less bridled. I’m wondering what it will be like? Will there be a big splash?  Will it be fast or gradual?

I checked my watch again. The 3pm deadline had passed. The world continued. Eventually, I graduated from 8th grade as a proud Sam Levy Elementary School Llama. (if there can be such a thing) 48 years later, as of this writing, California is still there.

This week, there was a story in the news that geologists have determined that two of the major southern California earthquake fault lines were actually connected and, in fact, one big fault. In other words, there’s a potentially huge earthquake out there, just waiting to happen. Again.

If you’re a budding song-writer, here’s your chance to catch this wave.

Now, Seattle is said to be overdue for an earthquake of some sort. So, for now, I’ll maintain our stash of stale granola bars under the house, those outdated bottles of water and continue to guard those 96 bottles of outstanding wine in our wine cellar.

Oh and a storm door to keep everyone else out.  At least until the wine is gone.

Tim Hunter

 

Yay! I’m Another Seattle Statistic!

You hear the talk show hosts saying our city is out of control.  Dave Ross, most mornings on KIRO, lists the car break-ins, thefts and burglaries that took place over the last 24 hours. You’d think Mad Max was running the place.

This past Sunday morning, my wife and I headed out to do some shopping. But when we got to the car, my door wasn’t completely closed. The contents of the glove box was everywhere and some things were missing–a flashlight, a phone charging cord, etc.  Fortunately, all the car’s paperwork was still there–registration, dealer papers and such.

We cleaned things up, started backing up and then I thought, “I wonder if they took anything off the carport?” Sure enough, the pressure washer I had used recently to clean off the front of the house, was gone.

In the grand scheme of things, as robberies go, I got off pretty lucky. Yes, I was pissed as hell. The idea that some druggie was out scrounging in our carport feet from our bedroom at 4am in the morning makes me want to set up bear traps.

But things happen for a reason. So I’ll just assess what happened, what I learned and use the occasion to grow.

My Ring Doorbell–Seriously, best security investment ever. It cost a couple of hundred dollars, but it’s the eye on the front porch that they don’t suspect.  That’s how I knew the scoundrel was doing his dirty deeds from 4:23am-4:38am. The motion-detection feature grabs video of anyone coming into view of the front door.  Yes, it was too dark to make out the suspect, but it did give me time parameters and allowed me to listen to my pressure washer being wheeled down the driveway.

The Police Report–Sure, I did this, despite the fact I’ve heard multiple times it just doesn’t do any good. I actually called in two times, eventually getting a very nice person who gave me the option of having an officer come out, someone calling me or doing the form online. I went with what was behind door number three and filled out the form.  You know, it makes you wonder how many crimes are NOT reported, since the police even state on that form words to the effect of , “Yeah, nothing is going to probably happen.”  And the typo’s on the form made me wonder, “Do they even really look at these?”  Unless dis and undertsand are up & coming words.

two-questions

Let The Neighbors Know–Our little neighborhood is pretty quiet and we know almost everyone on the block. Therefore, let them know you were ripped off. You may find out that they also had something stolen and helps make people keep an eye out for those who you don’t recognize around the hood.

It would be easy to dismiss this incident as just the price of living in the city. But it’s just another of many examples of how Seattle needs some serious fixing. I will take care of my property and take steps to prevent anything like that from happening again (or at least catch a good picture of them next time). It’s just a shame anyone should have to go through something like this in the first place.

Tim Hunter

 

 

 

The Wednesday Night Picnics

I know a lot of people.

As Walter Brennan said in his short-lived 1960’s TV series, The Guns of Will Sonnett, “No brag. Just fact.”

I’ve self-analyzed what caused me to be that way. My favorite theory is rooted in the small Lutheran grade school in southern California I attended that suddenly closed. I found my compact world grew quickly as I was tossed into public schools and became “the new kid.”  I wanted people to like me and I found that making them laugh accomplished that.  Then, it became an addiction, which evolved into a radio career. Of course, the more people you get to know, the more that can potentially like you. There’s also the bottom line that I just enjoy people. Everyone’s different, everyone has their own story.

Moving to Seattle and marrying into the Norwegian world, I’ve gotten to know even more people over the past 9 years. This past week, I got to know even more.

We received an invitation from friends to attend a “Wednesday Night Picnic” at a private estate up on Capitol Hill, an area east of downtown Seattle full of old, brick mansions. That’s about as much as I knew going in. Basically, we would be picnicking along with other people having their own picnics in the yard of a huge estate.

I felt very privileged to have been included in this long-time Seattle tradition. How long have these Wednesday nights in July picnics been going on? Would you believe 58 years?  As you can read in this article from the Seattle Times, the estate’s owner, Kay Bullitt, has done a lot of things for this city, very quietly. Not for show, but for the love of Seattle. And people.

She has used her estate to host all kinds of events including these neighborhood picnics. Her daughter Dorothy told me that back in the 60’s, her mom held a integrated camp for kids. There was also a “Peace Camp” for Jewish and Arab kids. And when Kay’s days on this earth are done, she has designed that the entire property will go to the city and be turned into a public park. Initially, there was talk of tearing down the mid-century home on the premises, but it now looks as though they’ll keep it around for a possible meeting facility.

First-timers to this Wednesday Night Picnic were asked to NOT take pictures of the neighbors and other people attending, but I was able to snap a few shots of the grounds and our little party.

Peace & Tranquility

Peace & Tranquility

A small playground

A small playground

Oh and from this vantage point.....

Oh and walk to the edge of the property over here…

And you can see the house across the street, towards Seattle, currently being remodeled before it’s new owner moves in.

Maybe Macklemore will invite us over sometime...

Maybe Macklemore will invite us over sometime

It was a very relaxed gathering of Seattleites, all just enjoying a perfect summer evening and the beautiful grounds thanks to our generous host. And now, I know even more people.

As one neighbor and his wife prepared to walk home, he came over, introduced himself and then invited us to come back next month for an afternoon of opera on the lawn.  Just bring a picnic, some chairs and enjoy. It should make for a splendid day of relaxing music. As long as that new neighbor doesn’t crank up the tunes.

The Wednesday Night Summer Picnics weren’t on my bucket list. But now I’m going to write it on the list just so I can cross it off.

Thank you, Kay, for everything you’ve done.

Tim Hunter

OH GIVE ME A HOME…

Once upon a time, you could have a different opinion on a topic and not be instantly labeled a jerk or insensitive or worse.

You’re a Republican or Democrat?  Independent?  Cool.  It’s what you believe, we all have the best interest of this country at heart—we just have different ways of getting there. Got it!

I don’t know when the shift began or maybe it’s a generational thing, but we’ve become a society of “If it’s not my way, I’m not going to play!” (see Kentucky) Rather than allowing people to have opinions and then go with what the majority wants, there are now clear-cut lines that you are simply not allowed to cross over.

This week, I’m tackling one of those topics:  homelessness.  Prepare to call me a jerk.

Seattle has a serious homeless problem that is getting worse by the year.  Yet, the politically correct way to talk about homelessness is to do everything in our power to make them more comfortable.  Not get them out of their situation, just enable it.

That doesn’t work for me.

Now, when you drive along I-5 in Seattle, you see little camping tents set up under freeway overpasses or on hillsides.  The residents will get up, spend the day panhandling or begging for funds to continue their barely-getting-by lifestyle only to wake up the next day and do it again. Some see it as a reminder of the homeless issue.  Others see them and feel guilty, as if WE have failed them.

For you 30s and under, it never used to be this way.  Oh, sure, in the 1920s after the Stock Market crash, little shanty towns sprung up where people lived until they could get back on their feet.  It was a tentative existence until the economy turned around. But the residents of those villages never ever planned to stay their the rest of their lives.  Today’s homeless seem to be content with their surroundings, and homelessness has become a lifestyle.

Seattle and the Misdirected Compassionates (I should register that term) have created conditions that cause these pup tent apartments and villages to be an acceptable option.  They are not.

Seattle’s current philosophy on the homeless:

Regardless of history, drugs or alcohol abuse, anyone who has chosen to live this lifestyle is a saint.  Their welfare comes before those of tax-paying citizens, as our politicians set up tent villages in areas far from their homes but close to ours.

Church members gather together to pack sandwiches, drop them off, then drive home while patting themselves on the back.  Of course, they don’t do that for every meal every day, but one day a week or a month and they’re able to feel a little less guilty.

I don’t remember “Thou shalt be coddled and waited on by people who work and have earned everything they’ve got.”  I do remember “Helping the poor.”  Helping.  An active form of the word, “help.”

Enabling, accommodating, coddling, and tolerating is not helping. Forcing a homeless camp into a neighborhood because the city claims it knows best is not helping.

People who are down on their luck need real help and real solutions.  Job training, counseling, a safe place to live temporarily while they make the effort to help themselves.

You say, “Well, Tim, that’s going to cost a lot of money.”  In 2014, Seattle spent $40-million on homeless services.  Add to that all the efforts of churches and private social agencies and you can see we have the weapons to fight this plague. Instead, we opt to show compassion, at any cost.  Well, $40-million last year, to be exact.

To get ahold of this issue, perhaps we need a Homeless Czar. Someone that leads the efforts of the city and county and enforces it.  You’re homeless?  Here’s how we’ll help you fix that.   Choose to ignore that, continue abusing drugs or alcohol and prepare to suffer the legal consequences.

Oh, that’s right.  There are laws.   I was driving through Bothell yesterday and noticed there were white letters painted on the freeway pillars, saying “No trespassing.”   That’s right, it’s actually illegal to just toss a tent up anywhere and call it home. The burbs enforce it.  The city of Seattle feels the compassionate response is to ignore it.

I’ll cover for you on the next response: “But Tim, you can’t just arrest those people.”  No, you give them warnings.  If they ignore them, then they do get arrested.  If you make the threat real, word will spread.  Seattle is NOT where to go when you’re homeless. Go to any suburb, try that and you will be arrested.

You see, what they’re doing is against the law.  We are currently ignoring all kinds of laws—vagrancy, trespassing, etc—because, currently, homelessness buys you lots of leeway.

“But we just need to ignore those laws.”  OK, so which laws do you want to ignore?  Do we all get to ignore them or just the homeless?  And which ones are you keeping?  We live in a society of laws.  Otherwise, you have anarchy.

Our Homeless Czar should compare notes with other major cities about how they’re handling this issue. I remember traveling to Japan a couple of decades ago and saw a homeless guy, begging. One guy.  I asked our guide if homelessness was a problem in Japan and she told me that being homeless was a great shame to the family, so they often would take care of it themselves.

The way I see it, there are three ways to deal with the homeless situation:  Keep feeding it and hope that it fixes itself, do everything in our power to just hide it away from our sight, or make a commitment to really deal with what’s happening out there.

Think about it—Seattle spent $40-million on the homeless issue and yet, it continues to get worse.  There are people who have found themselves living on the streets due to unfortunate circumstances.  We have too much at our disposal not to offer help to those in need.

But again, they need real help, not “feel good” enabling.

Tim Hunter

tents

OK, Playtime Is Over

Seattle has earned the reputation of being too nice, too accommodating when it comes to anarchists.

So, unlike most major cities in the U.S., when May 1st rolls around, we allow our downtown area to be held hostage by a large collection of thugs wearing masks, throwing rocks, bottles and anything they can get their hands on at p0lice, buildings and other public and private property.  All in the name of “punishing corporations.”

It’s time to stop tolerating this coward’s party.  Yes, you’re mighty brave behind that black mask, hanging around a bunch of like-minded morons.  Obviously mommy and daddy told you to be you, to be “the best anarchist you can be” and after a night of destruction, there’s probably a nice plate of milk and cookies waiting for you at home in your basement room.

As you might pick up, I’m done.  I’m embarrassed.  For as much as I like to brag about my adopted home town, when the 1st of May rolls around and Seattle tolerates this kind of destruction–when businesses have to close early out of fear what might happen to them or their employees–that’s nothing short than legitimized terrorism.

You have the absolute right to peacefully protest.  This country was built on that right.  Spraying buildings with graffiti, breaking out the windows of a news car, carrying a rifle into a crowd (yes, there was a guy that was interviewed on TV), ALL are not protected under the U.S. Constitution.

So, I have solutions.  I have thoughts.  I have ideas on how best to deal with this problem to greatly reduce the number of participants every year.  See what you think.

1) Every police officer on duty that night wears camera vests.  That way, when you’re arrested and taken to trial, we’ll have video proof of which crime you so boldly committed while wearing your mask.

2)  Police snipers are set up where ever the crowd gets out of control.  They take their position, armed only with paint guns and when they see someone break a window, the sharpshooter nails the perpetrator with a paint gun ball.  He’s marked, police arrest anyone marked with paint gun stains, and we make the largest arrest of unruly protesters in May Day history.

3)  Besides the sharp-shooters—more video cameras, to capture the broad scene for further prosecution.

You wouldn’t have to do this every year.  One out of three.  Or as needed.  Once this happens in Seattle, like rats when their safe hangout is disrupted, these thugs will find another city to target.  Although, I believe this model could prove effective for almost any city.

I’m all about peaceful protests.  There were several of those in Seattle yesterday as part of May Dy. But being destructive for misguided reasons is NOT an excuse.  We’re standing up to bullying in our schools.  It’s time to take that cause to the streets.

Besides, threatening police lives should be a crime.  In fact, I’m pretty sure it is.

May Day Seattle

My final suggestion. The parents of anyone arrested for causing damage to property will be invoiced for compensation.  You turned out this gem of a human being, so you get to pay for them. Either that, or we bring out that mom from Baltimore and turn her loose for a couple of ass whoopin’s.

Mr. Mayor or Seattle Police, if you need any more suggestions, please reach me at my usual number.

Tim Hunter

A Rare Opportunity

12 logo

Recently, I blogged about Christmas, encouraging everyone to absorb what was around them and enjoy all that the season offers. It can be such a magical time of year if we just allow it. But, as they say, Christmas comes but once a year, always making its annual arrival at Costco, sometime in August.

Right now, Seattle Seahawks fans have one of the rarest of opportunities available to any sports fans. To follow a team that generations will look back on as one of the greatest N.F.L. teams in history.

In my near 60 years on earth, I’ve had the good fortune to be able to cheer for a championship team or two. There were the 1963 Los Angeles Dodgers, that swept the New York Yankees in the World Series, four games to none. Two years later, they blew the first two games of the World Series, only to come back and beat the Minnesota Twins in seven games. Two championships in three years!  That was back in the days when World Series games were played during the day and the cool teachers were the ones who brought in a TV so we could watch during school.

Always while growing up, I got to experience an NBA championship.  However, it was after years of the Los Angeles Lakers losing to either the Boston Celtics and the New York Knicks (I think the league made them take turns).

When I moved to the championship desert of Seattle in the early 1970s, I began my conversion to the local sports teams. That worked out well with the Sonics, as they won the N.B.A. championship in 1979.

And then, the great dark period began.

The Mariners came close.  OK, our W.N.B.A. team, the Storm won a title. The UW Husky Football team won a co-National Championship in ’91. But our professional baseball, football and even our soccer teams would only flirt with greatness: a playoff game or two, then done.

When the Seahawks actually won the Super Bowl last year, you know what it was like. 12 flags all over town, jerseys everywhere. People not normally sports fanatics were talking about them. Then, upwards of 700,000 people took to downtown Seattle in the frigid cold for a victory parade. Amazingly, not a single arrest.

It was a special time that the pundits said was highly unlikely to repeat. And it’s happening. A win this Sunday and we have a chance at winning our second N.F.L. championship in a row.

I believe we can do it. Yes, you risk a serious heart-break if you allow yourself to get caught up in the madness and we fall short.  But first, don’t think that way.  Secondly, if we win—we get to experience sports nirvana. This team is special. The owner, the architects of the club, the talented, colorful and talented players, are the special concoction that every team in the league is trying to mix up. We’ve got it.

I hope you’re going in deep. That you believe. That you’re ready to experience something very few cities ever see. The beginning of a sports dynasty.

And brace yourself—because we just may have to do this all over again next year.

Let’s just focus on winning Sunday, then the re-Pete.  Then, the 3-Pete next year. Go Hawks!

Tim Hunter

D-Day for May Day

I'm pretty sure the constitution guarantees the right to break windows with a skateboard

I’m pretty sure the constitution guarantees the right to break windows with a skateboard

For whatever reason, the first day of May has become a day of rioting in Seattle.  Oh, it’s not a group riot.  It’s a select collection of knuckleheads who are made up of locals and troubled kids from other cities, who use the march to support workers (big in communist countries, mind you) to break windows and vandalize downtown businesses.

Last year, it was if our police force was caught off guard, as mask and hood wearing vandals would do their damage and then duck back into the crowd.  To them, this is just a big game and a way to punish the successful.  The second any of them were arrested, they’d start screaming “police brutality.”

By the way, quick side-note.  Do you really think that the stores paid for all the damage caused by vandals?  Muck like graffiti and shoplifting, it’s the rest of us that pay.   The stores merely increase prices to cover whatever insurance doesn’t cover.  Just sayin’….

So, back to “What to do about the cowards who cause the damage on May Day?”  Again, it’s not a large number, so here’s my plan:

Set up phony video crews, like TV news teams–a reporter, a camera guy-complete with call letters and have them video-taping away so you capture high-quality video of the destruction.

Next, set up a swat team of paint guy snipers, who shoot anyone who throws a brick through a window or smashes a car windshield is marked….so when police arrest them and they deny being the vandal, we have video proof.

Do that a couple of years and watch the event return to just a march instead of a license to loot.

Better ideas welcome.  But just standing by and protecting the right to riot doesn’t work.

Tim Hunter

Drone On

Lately, remote control drones have been in the news a lot.  Not just on a nation and international level, but also right here in Seattle.

President Obama has been in favor of utilizing unmanned drones to attack insurgents and Al Qaeda members who would do us harm.  The big flap this week was that we used one to blow up an Al Qaeda leader who was born in the U.S.  In other words, we used a weapon against an American citizen.  Frankly, he lost any protection of being a citizen when he embraced an organization that considers the destruction of the U.S. as their Superbowl.

Now, closer to home, the federal government had given the city of Seattle some drones to experiment with, to see if we’d like to incorporate them into our law enforcement efforts.  For some reason, Mike “Out there” McGinn and the Seattle police chief decided to scrap the test.  Why?  Because they can.

This after approving cameras along the Seattle waterfront. Oh, and those cameras at certain intersections, to catch the red-light runners.

I just don’t get it.

First off, they’re not armed.  They’re used for surveillance.  How many times have you heard the phrase, “There’s never a cop around when you need one!”  This would allow them to have a bird’s eye view of the city.  Bank robbery breaks out–get away car headed north on I-5?  The drone’s going to get there a lot faster to pursue the bad guys than the police can through traffic, even with their sirens.  If you live down in Los Angeles, a police helicopter flying over your house is a pretty common occurence.  I’ve got to think that the cost of a copter and trained personnel is going to be a lot more than a remote-controlled drone.

The biggest critics of the drones appear to be the privacy pirates.  The ones who are so concerned about police being able to go over our homes in the sky.  Why is that?  They might catch me barbecuing?  See how many weeds have sprung up in the backyard?  Turn me in because I’ve neglected to refill the bird feeder?  As is often the case, the ones most concerned about their privacy are trying to protect getting caught from doing something illegal.  If you’re not doing anything wrong, what are you worried about?

Do what I do on some of these issues and take it to the extreme.  So, you’re not OK with a drone flying overhead.  But you’re OK with a police helicopter?  Or, we don’t allow those?  OK, then we keep it on the ground and only allow police to patrol in their cars.  Very inefficient and costly, but…..Oh, they shouldn’t be in cars, that’s not fair or also an invasion of your rights?  OK, we’ll put them on foot patrol.  Now, get into a situation that requires police help and let’s see how fast they can arrive on the scene.

Maybe it’s because I’ve known quite a few law enforcement folks over the years to realize that it’s not an “us versus them” situation.  They ARE us.  They’re Justin’s dad, or Bob’s wife, or the neighbor down the street.  They’ve gone through training, they risk their lives every time they show up for work and because a few bad apples have lost it under pressure, we’re suppose to tie the hands behind all of them and then say, “OK, now do your job!”

The drones over our city would seriously help the efficiency and effectiveness of those charged with protecting us.  I’m sorry to see grand-standing politicians get in the way of making their job safer and a little bit easier.

Tim Hunter

It Was The Dumbest of Times

I had to do a double-take when I read the headline: “Snow wimps: Seattle is shut down by first real snow of the season.”

OK, maybe they’ve got something there.  After all, it’s fair to self-evaluate one’s self for the sake of improvement.  Snow does cause people to do funny things.  A few years ago, a well-meaning nutjob Seattle mayor decided not to put salt on the roads because he said  it could go into our drain system and find its way into the Puget Sound.  A body of salt water, I might add.

But this headline was yanked right out of the Los Angeles Times!  The place where it never snows was criticizing how we reacted to the largest snowstorm we’ve seen here in 30 years. Yep, someone sitting around in their bathrobe in a town where 60-degrees triggers a frost warning was calling us a town full of “snow wimps”.

Maybe Anchorage has the right to do that.  Or a Siberian writer.  But what’s with Los Angeles judging us on how we deal with snow.  Now, I spent the first 18 years of my life growing up in Torrance and outside of a couple of hard frosts, we never had anything close to snow.  I remember as a young kid, we would drive up to Santa’s Village near Big Bear Lake to see some real snow.  For a time in the 60s, we had that classic Mr. & Mrs. Snowman scene in the family front yard at Christmas, complete with white fiberglass snow. After a couple of years, it became dirty and looked more like an aquarium filter than it did snow.

Now, a writer entrenched in the warm ocean-side region of  Southern California has deemed us wimps.  Because we get into accidents?  Wimps don’t get into accidents, they stay at home.  And, while you may call them wimps, it could be out of wisdom that they stay at home.  The accident statistics you stated were examples of those who didn’t know better or thought they were better at snow driving than they really were.  But they weren’t wimps.

I’ve done my fair share of proving myself over the years.  My guess is the only chains this writer has ever installed were 14-karat and went around his neck.  I’ve driven with and without chains, gone through years of changing tires over to put on the studded ones.  Even though I grew up in California, I’ve easily been through a couple of dozen snow episodes up here.  Being on the radio a bunch of years, I HAD to get in…wimping out simply was not an option.  I don’t see how going out into the snow, having an inexperienced driver plow into me and spending the next several weeks working with a body shop to repair my car makes me less wimpy.

I can’t decide if it’s arrogance or ignorance or a combination of both (ignoarrogance) that inspired this writer to pick on Seattle.  One fact that may have eluded him/her is that our weather forecasts are about as accurate as our country’s economic forecasts.  The local weather folks have a sketchy record at best and even with all the latest technology, they still didn’t nail this one.  As I write this piece, it’s snowing.  Something that wasn’t supposed to be happening today. We went from “maybe some snow” to “up to 14 inches” to “well, maybe 6-inches” to a Winter Storm warning and back to snow.  Today was supposed to be Thawsday, the day we returned to a steady Seattle diet of rain, with occasional showers and drizzle thrown in for variety.  Just turned around again. It’s still snowing.

I’ve heard people from the midwest start to criticize Seattle drivers and how we handle the snow. But after reminding them that they live on a mostly level playing surface and we have hills, mountains and other sharp inclines, they’ll say, “Oh, yeah.”  We’ve got speedbumps that have a higher elevation than Beverly Hills.

Wimps.  Someone in LA criticizing how we deal with our snow is like someone in Seattle criticizing how you run your pro football team.  Oh, wait….

So thank you for the wonderful observations from the land of Kardashians, drive-by shootings and where kites can actually get stuck in the sky on the really bad smog days.  Since we’re helping each other out, why don’t you tan less, stop outsourcing solutions to your problems, use a lower dosage of Botox and stick to offering sage advice to people closer to home.  From what we hear in the news on a daily basis, there are a lot of people who need your help.  For instance, do what you can to stop the animated Napoleon Dynamite show from airing another episode.

We appreciate your thoughts and find it comforting that you’d take the time to point out our inadequacies.  After all, Los Angeles driving is the envy of the nation, if not the free world.

Also, thanks for the reminder of why I got out of there almost 40 years ago.

Tim Hunter